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Campbell House Museum

Campbell House Museum
DESCRIPTION

Campbell House is the oldest remaining house from the original site of the Town of York. Built in 1822 by Judge William Campbell and his wife Hannah, the home was designed for entertaining and comfort, and constructed at a time when the Campbells were socially and economically established and their children had grown to adulthood.

The house is one of the few surviving examples of Georgian architecture left in Toronto. Campbell House is constructed in a style in vogue during the late Georgian era known as Palladian architecture. This style was Italian in origin, and based upon elements of classical Greek and Roman architecture, which emphasized symmetry of features (windows, fireplaces, doors etc.) and grandiose proportions to exhibit wealth.

Campbell House is a fine example of Georgian architecture and was moved in 1972 to the present site. Beautifully restored to reflect the lifestyle of a judge who became Chief Justice of Upper Canada, the house provides a glimpse into the early life of the Town of York, now known as Toronto.

Located in Toronto’s justice precinct, at the northwest corner of Queen Street West and University Avenue, the classical house with surrounding park is a contrast to, and a stage from which to contemplate, the urban scene arrayed before it:  the skyline of office towers and rising condos, City Hall and the courts, University Avenue, and the retail and cultural strip of Queen Street West. Campbell House is owned by the City of Toronto. The museum is operated by the Sir William Campbell Foundation and the grounds are maintained as a public park by the City on land leased from The Great-West Life Assurance Co.

Contact Information
Address:
160 Queen Street West, Toronto, ON M5H 3H3, Canada
Phone: (416) 597-0227
Website:
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